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Tuesday, 13 February 2018

An idealist is one who, on noticing that a rose smells better than a cabbage, concludes that it makes a better soup

An idealist is one who, on noticing that a rose smells better than a cabbage, concludes that it makes a better soup
― H.L. Mencken, A Book of Burlesques

Thursday, 8 February 2018

I Know Once you understand the foundations of cooking - whatever kind you like, whether it's French or Italian or...


I Know Once you understand the foundations of cooking - whatever kind you like, whether it's French or Italian or Japanese - you really don't need a cookbook anymore.
#Cooking #IKnow

Monday, 5 February 2018

Probably the best Souffle in the West "The only thing that will make a souffle fall is if it knows you're afraid of...


Probably the best Souffle in the West "The only thing that will make a souffle fall is if it knows you're afraid of it"

of the French verb souffler which means "to breathe" or "to puff".

The development and popularization of the soufflé is usually traced to French chef Marie-Antoine Carême in the early nineteenth century.

Soufflés are typically prepared from two basic components:

A flavoured crème pâtissière, cream sauce or béchamel, or a purée as the base
egg whites beaten to a soft peak
The base provides the flavour and the egg whites provide the "lift", or puffiness to the dish.

"You can give the same recipe to ten cooks, and some make it come alive, and some make a flat souffle.
A system doesn't guarantee anything"